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Lecture [clear filter]
Thursday, August 16
 

10:00am

Introduction to Mushrooms of Colorado
Speakers
avatar for Graham Steinruck

Graham Steinruck

Graham Steinruck served as the 2012 editor of SporesAfield, the newsletter for the Colorado Mycological Society, as well as the vice president of the club in 2011. He volunteers for the Arkansas Valley Mushroom Club as a chief identifier. He is a presenter at the Telluride Mushroom... Read More →



Thursday August 16, 2018 10:00am - 11:00am
Sheridan Opera House 110 N Oak St, Telluride, CO 81435

11:00am

Fungal Dinosaurs from the Lost World
The Tepui region of South America contains some of the most remote and pristine forests on the planet.Mycological expeditions over the last 15+ years have yielded a cornucopia of unusual fungi including hundreds of new species and genera of macrofungi. This talk will cover the basics of conducting fieldwork in remote areas and present some of the incredible mushrooms of the region.
 

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Aime

Cathy Aime

Dr. M. Catherine Aime earned her doctorate in Biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and StateUniversity in 2001 and completed her postdoctoral research at the University of Oxford in the UnitedKingdom. She worked for four years as a research molecular biologist with the USDA-ARS... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
Sheridan Opera House 110 N Oak St, Telluride, CO 81435

1:00pm

Think Like a Fungus: Mushrooms and their Roles in Rocky Mountain Ecosystems
Symbiosis is just the beginning. Every wild thing in the forest or jungle depends on fungi to feed, protect, and digest it. Some mushrooms feed bears in springtime, others feed deer in August. Squirrels in the West rely on a diet of lichens and truffles. Fungi defend fir needles from inside, and dozens of species service the root needs of every tree. Rocky Mountain mushrooms are adapted to a "fire dependent" ecosystem, and a quarter of all ascomycete species here fruit only after a burn. Fungi are the masters of the soil ecosystem in the Rockies, and the loss of soil carbon and subsequent increase in wildfire are critical issues that few understand are connected. Human behavior unwittingly kills fungi, resulting in loss of water quality, moisture retention, and soil erosion.

Speakers
avatar for Larry Evans

Larry Evans

Larry Evans is this guy from Missoula Montana who comes to Telluride and knows quite a bit about mushrooms. He has spent over 40 years looking for morels, and he usually finds them. He is a vastly underappreciated songwriter who was featured in a comedy documentary by famous Canadian... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Sheridan Opera House 110 N Oak St, Telluride, CO 81435

2:00pm

Fungi on Fungi: Mushrooms That Grow on Other Mushrooms

Some of the common familiar Fungi on Fungi include the Edible Lobster Mushroom (Hypomyces lactifluorum) that grows on Russula or Lactarius species and turns them orange and The Amanita Mold (Hypomyces hyalinus) that occurs on Amanitas. But there are many other interesting and unusual species.

At a foray several years back, I dug inside the garbage can and pulled out some rotting fungi. Upon closer examination I found 8 species that were growing on the decaying fungi that did not get recorded. It’s sort of fun to see what can be found with a closer look.     

BONUS!  A downloadable link to a 258 page PDF will be given at the end of the show that covers over 379 species of them.



Speakers
avatar for John Plischke

John Plischke

John Plischke III is a founding member of the Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Club, which has become one of the largest mushroom clubs in North America. John has been awarded the club’s Distinguished Service Award. Within the WPMC, John serves as Walk and Foray Chairman, is a member... Read More →



Thursday August 16, 2018 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Sheridan Opera House 110 N Oak St, Telluride, CO 81435

3:00pm

Mushroom Bioaccumulation: Current Perspectives and Future Research Needs

Fungi are effective facilitators of chemical transport through ecosystems because of their vast mycelial networks and the ability to move large amounts of nutrients and pollutants from their environment into their mushroom fruiting bodies.  While there is clear evidence of the hyperaccumulation of certain nutrients and heavy metals in mushrooms, bioaccumulation is highly variable between different chemicals and species of fungi.  Additionally, for many organic pollutants, which are often the focus of mycoremediation discussions, very little data exists on the mushroom sequestration and in some cases there are not even established protocols for how to test for them.

            In this presentation we will cover the mycelial uptake and transport of chemicals from their environment to their fruiting bodies then review the current understanding, or lack of understanding of which minerals, nutrients, heavy metals, and organic pollutants are stored well in mushrooms.  The implications of this topic are wide reaching, from cultivating mineral fortified mushrooms to risks of foraging mushrooms in contaminated environments to ecological consequences of food web toxicity from mushroom hyperaccumulation.

            Can you safely eat that oyster mushroom growing out of the oil spill?  Where is the fungus taking those heavy metals?  Are wild mushrooms more nutritionally potent than cultivated ones?  We will explore these questions and more!


Speakers
avatar for Leif Olson

Leif Olson

Leif is an environmental scientist and mushroom cultivator based out of Brevard, NC.  He explores the interrelations between ecological health, human health, food production, environmental contamination and the restoration of degraded landscapes.  Leif’s work has ranged from the... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Sheridan Opera House 110 N Oak St, Telluride, CO 81435
 
Friday, August 17
 

10:00am

Rusts Never Sleep
In terms of species numbers and ubiquity, rust fungi are an incredibly successful lineage. Together, the more than 7000 described species form the largest known group of plant pathogens, while also having incredibly complex life cycles. This talk will explore the biology of these fascinating organisms and discuss the contributions that molecular systematics have made to our understanding of their evolution.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Aime

Cathy Aime

Dr. M. Catherine Aime earned her doctorate in Biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and StateUniversity in 2001 and completed her postdoctoral research at the University of Oxford in the UnitedKingdom. She worked for four years as a research molecular biologist with the USDA-ARS... Read More →


Friday August 17, 2018 10:00am - 11:00am
Sheridan Opera House 110 N Oak St, Telluride, CO 81435

1:00pm

The Changing Shape of Mushrooms

Field guides group mushrooms by forms—agarics are in one section, polypores in another, and so on—but molecular phylogenies show that there have been rampant shifts in morphology through evolution. In this talk, Dr. Hibbett will present selected examples of lineages where there have been dramatic shifts in morphology. He will also ask if there are any general evolutionary trends discernible, or if all this change is random?


Speakers
avatar for David Hibbett

David Hibbett

David Hibbett is a biology professor at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. He received his PhD from Duke University and did postdoctoral research at the Tottori Mycological Institute in Japan, and at Harvard University. David has broad interests in evolutionary biology... Read More →


Friday August 17, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Sheridan Opera House 110 N Oak St, Telluride, CO 81435